Skip to Content Skip to HDC Navigation Skip to Apple Best Practice Navigation

Effect of orchard sprays

 

Relatively few types of sprays are applied to directly improve the storage quality of apples. Notable exceptions include the use of calcium and phosphorus sprays that are described in Section 2 of this part of the Guide.
Most sprays are applied to protect the crop against the damaging effects of fungal diseases, insects and mites and their use is described in Part 2 of the Guide. 
Bioregulant sprays are also applied to apple trees for specific purposes such as increased fruit set, fruit thinning, fruit shape, improved skin finish or control of shoot growth. Clearly bioregulant sprays are applied to induce a physiological response in the tree or fruit and are therefore more likely to affect the physiology of fruits during the storage period than protectant sprays.
However, a number of fungicides are reported to have side effects that influence storage quality. Recent evidence has shown that the susceptibility of CA-stored Cox apples to diffuse browning disorder (DBD) is associated with the application of triazole chemicals that include the commonly applied fungicides myclobutanil (‘Systhane’ and ‘Aristocrat’) and penconazole (‘Topas’ and ‘Topenco’). See Section 13 for more information on DBD.
There have been examples in the past where bioregulant sprays applied during fruit development have resulted in major adverse effects on the storage quality of the fruit. The most notable example was the use of daminozide (‘Alar’) to control vegetative growth in Cox trees that resulted in a marked increase in susceptibility of stored fruit to core flush and breakdown.
With the exception of paclobutrazol (‘Cultar’) bioregulants currently permitted for use in apple orchards in the UK do not appear to cause adverse effects on storage quality. However it is true to say that without trials dedicated to testing effects of compounds or mixtures of compounds on storage and eating quality we may be unaware of possible adverse effects in the future.
In early trials the effects of paclobutrazol on storage quality were generally positive whilst GA4+7 (‘Regulex’) appeared to have no effect. However, fruit-setting hormones (GA3 + 2,4,5-TP), recommended where frost has destroyed a high proportion of flowers, had major adverse effects on the storage quality of Bramley apples.
Fruit thinning sprays are expected to have generally beneficial effects on eating quality through establishing the desired leaf to fruit ratio. However, over-thinning will result in oversized fruit and a high leaf to fruit ratio that is likely to result in increased susceptibility to calcium deficiency disorders.
In recent grower trials application of paclobutrazol induced DBD in CA-stored fruit from some of the orchards although triazole fungicides promoted DBD to a greater extent. The highest incidence of DBD generally occurred where paclobutrazol was applied in combination with triazole fungicides.
Restrictions on the use of triazole chemicals are advised for Cox and Meridian. Other cultivars with Cox as a parent may also be at risk but generally none of these are widely grown in the UK.
Products have been developed that regulate the ripening of fruit on the tree (‘ReTainR’), Valent BioSciences Corporation) or on the harvested fruit prior to storage (SmartFreshTM, Landseer Ltd). Unfortunately, Valent BioSciences Corporation is no longer pursuing the registration of ‘ReTainR’in the UK. However, SmartFreshTM is fully approved for use on apples in the UK (see Section 8). 

Relatively few types of sprays are applied to directly improve the storage quality of apples. Notable exceptions include the use of calcium and phosphorus sprays that are described elsewhere in this part of the Guide.

Most sprays are applied to protect the crop against the damaging effects of fungal diseases, insects and mites. 

Bioregulant sprays are also applied to apple trees for specific purposes such as increased fruit set, fruit thinning, fruit shape, improved skin finish or control of shoot growth. Clearly bioregulant sprays are applied to induce a physiological response in the tree or fruit and are therefore more likely to affect the physiology of fruits during the storage period than protectant sprays.

However, a number of fungicides are reported to have side effects that influence storage quality. Recent evidence has shown that the susceptibility of CA-stored Cox apples to diffuse browning disorder (DBD) is associated with the application of triazole chemicals that include the commonly applied fungicides myclobutanil (‘Systhane’ and ‘Aristocrat’) and penconazole (‘Topas’ and ‘Topenco’).

There have been examples in the past where bioregulant sprays applied during fruit development have resulted in major adverse effects on the storage quality of the fruit. The most notable example was the use of daminozide (‘Alar’) to control vegetative growth in Cox trees that resulted in a marked increase in susceptibility of stored fruit to core flush and breakdown.

With the exception of paclobutrazol (‘Cultar’) bioregulants currently permitted for use in apple orchards in the UK do not appear to cause adverse effects on storage quality. However it is true to say that without trials dedicated to testing effects of compounds or mixtures of compounds on storage and eating quality we may be unaware of possible adverse effects in the future.

In early trials the effects of paclobutrazol on storage quality were generally positive whilst GA4+7 (‘Regulex’) appeared to have no effect. However, fruit-setting hormones (GA3 + 2,4,5-TP), recommended where frost has destroyed a high proportion of flowers, had major adverse effects on the storage quality of Bramley apples.

Fruit thinning sprays are expected to have generally beneficial effects on eating quality through establishing the desired leaf to fruit ratio. However, over-thinning will result in oversized fruit and a high leaf to fruit ratio that is likely to result in increased susceptibility to calcium deficiency disorders.

In recent grower trials application of paclobutrazol induced DBD in CA-stored fruit from some of the orchards although triazole fungicides promoted DBD to a greater extent. The highest incidence of DBD generally occurred where paclobutrazol was applied in combination with triazole fungicides.

Restrictions on the use of triazole chemicals are advised for Cox and Meridian. Other cultivars with Cox as a parent may also be at risk but generally none of these are widely grown in the UK.

Products have been developed that regulate the ripening of fruit on the tree (‘ReTainR’), Valent BioSciences Corporation) or on the harvested fruit prior to storage (SmartFreshTM, Landseer Ltd). Unfortunately, Valent BioSciences Corporation is no longer pursuing the registration of ‘ReTainR’in the UK. However, SmartFreshTM is fully approved for use on apples in the UK.